kailan prawns

 

I like Hong Kong Kai Lan (chinese kale). This vegetable is tender and crunchy to the bite and is not as “fibrous” as the usual Kai Lan. I do wonder whether these Hong Kong Kai Lan are genetically modified to its current size since it looks like a baby kai lan. Even the Hong Kong Choy Sum also tastes as good.

 

Anyway, one of the most common way of cooking this vegetable is to add fresh prawns into the dish. The prawns lend a sweetness to the dish and a contrasting texture as well. But really, even if you can’t get your hands on fresh prawns, you can also omit it altogether.

 

This is my recipe for Stir Fried Hong Kong Kai Lan with Prawns

 

Ingredients

  • 200 grammes of Hong Kong Kai Lan (washed thoroughly and separate leaves from stem. Slice the stems lengthwise)
  • 10 to 15 medium sized prawns (devein and shelled, you can leave the tails intact if you want)
  • 6 slices of ginger (diced)
  • 5 cloves of garlic (chopped)
  • 30 ml warm water
  • Corn starch (add 1 tablespoon corn flour to 3 tablespoons of water and mix well)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Cooking oil (palm oil)

 

Seasoning

  • 2 teaspoons oyster sauce
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 teaspoons chinese cooking wine

 

Method

 

Heat oil in wok and fry ginger till aromatic. Add garlic and prawns and stir fry till prawns begin to turn colour. Add kai lan stems. Stir fry for about 20 seconds.

 

Add the kai lan leaves. Stir well and add seasoning. Add warm water and continue to stir fry till leaves turn dark green colour and limp. Add a little bit of corn starch if gravy too runny for your liking.

 

Serve warm preferably with white rice

Technorati Tags: Recipe, Vegetable, Prawns, Chinese, Malaysia


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Comments

  1. 1
    simcooks
    February 7th, 2007 at 1:24 pm

    Prawn shells can use to make a bit of prawn broth ya? You can use the broth instead of warm water to make the gravy.

  2. 2
    pablopabla
    February 7th, 2007 at 3:36 pm

    simcooks : Of course…just need a little bit more of work, that’s all 😉

  3. 3
    tigerfish
    February 7th, 2007 at 4:51 pm

    Har ? You called this baby ? I think it’s normal leh! Think your kai lan was cooked just right! I look at the color (still green…nice), and they look tender but firm (with crunch). Perfect!

    Hey, you left this words “keh chze pua lai” on my wat dan hor post…i thought for 1/2 hr but still can’t make out what they mean leh…maybe it’s already 12.45AM now, tt’s why my brain is not working, though my fingers still are (typing)….tell me! :O

  4. 4
    tigerfish
    February 7th, 2007 at 4:53 pm

    wah lau, i can’t believe myself! I know liow lah! Brrrr……

  5. 5
    Tummythoz
    February 7th, 2007 at 5:19 pm

    I find most green vege from Hongkong are smaller in size, crunchier & less fibrous. If only we can produce such quality locally, maybe they’ll be cheaper.

  6. 6
    pablopabla
    February 8th, 2007 at 1:39 pm

    tigerfish : Ya lah…it’s baby. But I took picture close close so it looks bigger than it is 🙂

    Tummythoz : I think Camerons is trying hard 😉

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  1. Recipe for Deep Fried Kailan Leaves with Garlic Fried Kailan Stems | Delicious Asian Food

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