sweet soy pork

This is a very traditional home-cooked meal in any Indonesian Chinese family. Known as “Bak Kecap” – literally translation of “pork with soy”, the dish is sometimes served as one dish meal, with the usual pairing of steamed rice.

We literally grew up with this. Sweet and full of carbohydrates. Though the ingredients may seem basic and almost too simple, it has never failed to be an all-time favourite amongst the youngsters in the family. Therein lies the secret to many home-cooked dishes – using simple ingredients for a quick satisfying meal. The meat is marinated for a short time before braised. The cornstarch / tapioca flour is used to improve the texture of the dish and the potatoes are pan-fried to add an extra crunch to it.

This is the recipe for Soft Pork Cubes with Soy Sauce and Potatoes

Ingredients

  • 250 gramme pork cutlet, cut into small bite sizes
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon white pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch / tapioca flour
  • 2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (Pearl River Bridge’s Mushroom Flavored Sauce recommended)
  • 3 medium sized potatoes (500 grammes), quartered and sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoon cooking oil
  • ¼ cup water

Method

Marinade the pork with salt, sugar, pepper, cornstarch and soy sauce for 10 – 15 min.

Heat a little bit of oil on a non-stick pan and brown the potato slices. Pat dry with kitchen towel and set aside.

Heat oil in a cooking wok, medium heat. Stir fry garlic till fragrant for about 2 minutes. Toss in the marinated pork. Cook for 5 minutes.

The wok will be sticky as the sugar caramelized. Add water. Stir in the fried potatoes and mix well. Cover and simmer for another 5 minutes.

Serve warm with steamed rice.

Growing up in a family heavily influenced by Chinese culture with spoonfuls of Indonesian flavorings, gastronomic experience has been a joyful ride for our Guest Chef Jun.

Experimenting heavily with online recipes and bits and pieces of culinary wisdom from all over the place, Jun became aware of the fact that Cooking is a form of art. No two people can cook up a same dish, even when using the same utensils and same ingredients and same recipes. But practice do make perfect. Read and be mesmerised by her daring cooking adventures at her IndoChineKitchen for an unforgettable visual feast!

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Comments

  1. 1
    noobcook
    November 18th, 2008 at 4:44 pm

    What a wonderful and delicious creation Jun =) Wish I can have this dish for my dinner later :P~

  2. 2
    Jaden, Steamy Kitchen
    November 18th, 2008 at 8:03 pm

    love the photo – looks wonderful.

  3. 3
    lk
    November 18th, 2008 at 11:34 pm

    Sounds really simple to a novice like me. Hehehe! Beautiful shot!

  4. 4
    tastesofhome
    November 19th, 2008 at 4:29 am

    wow, my mom makes this too! didnt know that this was of indo Chinese origin, this is one of my fav simple dishes with rice! yummy picture!

  5. 5
    Marirama
    November 20th, 2008 at 8:38 pm

    Hah! I just posted my pork dishes and I found yours. I like your pork dishes tho… hmm yum yum! I like the picture too

  6. 7
    reeseboston
    November 22nd, 2008 at 8:25 am

    I heart this pork dish! Will try to make this soon!

  7. 8
    Sorina
    November 24th, 2008 at 1:49 am

    This is a very entertaining blog. Well-written and clever. You are now on my favorite list.

  8. 9
    didally
    November 24th, 2008 at 3:57 pm

    Very nice photo! This dish is making me drool in front of my pc.

  9. 11
    pigpigscorner
    January 5th, 2009 at 12:23 am

    Wow nice colour and looks really delicious! I love sweet meat dishes, goes really well with rice.

  10. 12
    My Taste Heaven
    March 21st, 2009 at 11:59 am

    I have ever tried before an Indonesian chinese’s food in Hong Kong. I still cannot forget the savoury. But now after coming back home, I could not find the ‘taste’

  11. 13
    GladysKock
    September 14th, 2009 at 5:42 pm

    This is very homey dish that score high on yum-o-meter. Often is part of many Chinese homes legacy, handed down from generation to generation. I have excessive pork belly in my fridge and thanks for bumping into this, I just turned it into my lunch, and it’s an appetising dish! Thanks for sharing!

  12. 14
    Ancella Soo
    April 9th, 2010 at 5:50 pm

    Can I have some recipes for my kids age 7 & 5 ? I really
    don’t know what to cook for them sometimes!
    My younger son don’t like vegetables or meat!
    We don’t take beef or mutton. Thanks!!!

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